Cost Effective three part Erosion Control on Pear Street

 

Pear Street is a well designed community of homes in Rome, Georgia. The street runs along the top of a hill overlooking one of the rivers flowing through the wonderful North Georgia town.

 

Pear Street Community, Rome, Ga.
Pear Street Community, Rome, Ga.

 

 

And, all was well on Pear Street until they removed a sitting deck at the end of a walkway and noticed that there was an erosion problem that needed to be solved. I was called in to study and fix the problem. I noticed that the erosion problem started with a walkway that was slanted toward the hillside. It seemed to me that this walkway was acting like a riverbed and funneling all of the water down to the problem area.

 

The sidewalk acts as a riverbed
The sidewalk acts as a riverbed

 

I went to the end of the walkway and looked at the eroded area. I really couldn’t get a good picture because nothing I did showed the bank as steep and nasty as it was. An engineer had suggested a retaining wall, but I couldn’t see how we would be able to put in a serious footing, and if we did do a wall the cost would have been outrageous. There was absolutely no way to get machinery to the project, either.  It called for all hand work.

 

Nasty erosion area needs fixing
Nasty erosion area needs fixing

 

 

I thought about it for a few weeks. I came up with “Johntheplantman’s three principles of erosion control”

1.Capture and redirect the water

2.Fill and re shape the eroded surface

3.Provide sustainabilty for the surface to prevent further erosion.

The first step was to catch and redirect the water coming from the walkway. We used a concrete base and installed a drain strip which is similar to a catch basin. The strip hinges in the middle and it is installed with a slight drop toward the outer edges. Four inch black drain pipe was fastened to the outer edges of the catch basin and the pipe was buried to the sides of the wash. This would take the water from the walkway out to the sides and down to the ditch at the bottom of the hill.

Re direct the water with a catch basin and drain pipe
Re direct the water with a catch basin and drain pipe

A ten yard truckload of compost was wheel barrowed in and spread over the washed out area. We packed it as well as possible. Footing on the hillside was precarious.

 

wash out is filled with compost
wash out is filled with compost

 

One of the best coverings for erosion prevention is Curlex which consists of wood shavings enclosed in a plastic netting. I refer to it as an erosion blanket. The material is available in hundred foot rolls and is made to be laid out on a hillside. I’m sure that you have seen it used on highway construction projects. Grass seed is normally used along with this material, but I had other plans.

 

Randy with a 100 foot roll of Curlex
Randy with a 100 foot roll of Curlex

 

The Curlex is fastened to the ground with sod staples

 

erosion mat is attached to the ground with sod staples
erosion mat is attached to the ground with sod staples

 

And the covered site looked like this:

 

Curlex matting installed on hillside
Curlex matting installed on hillside

 

The Curlex in place will last a year or two before rotting which will give a ground cover time to become established over the erosion site. Since the site was in a shady location and also because maintenance would be difficult, I decided to use one of my favorite ground covers—vinca minor. We planted clumps of the vinca on 16 inch centers by poking a hole through the Curlex and planting into the compost below. The vinca will rapidly spread and hold the soil in place.

 

Vinca minor planted through erosion blanket to add sustainability.
Vinca minor planted through erosion blanket to add sustainability.

 

Adding a rock border and a bit of pine straw at the top of the hill gave the finished project a nice look and there should be no more problems

 

Add a little pine straw for looks, and another problem is solved
Add a little pine straw for looks, and another problem is solved

 The John the plant man articles are brought to you by John P. Schulz, author of Requiem for a Redneck 

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

 

Published by John P.Schulz

I lost my vocal cords a while back due to throat cancer. The laryngectomy sent me on a quest to find and learn to use my new, altered voice. I am able to talk now with a really small and neat new prosthesis. My writing reflects what I have learned in my search for a voice. My site johnschulzauthor.com publishes a daily motivational quote and a personal comment. I write an article a week for my blog, johntheplantman.com which deals with a lot of the things that I do in the garden. I am also the author of Requiem for a Redneck and the new Redemption for a Redneck--novels portraying the lives and doings of folks around the north Georgia hills. I have an English Education degree from the University of Georgia and very happily married to the lovely Dekie Hicks. You may enjoy my daily Quotes and Notes at http://johnschulzauthor.com/

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5 Comments

  1. This is so cool! I love how johntheplantman knew there was a way to deal with the problem without automatically going with the most expensive, ‘engineer’s’ solution of a retaining wall. And the vinca minor is a great touch.

  2. Hey John…where is this Pear Community located in Rome?
    I’m glad you used vinca MINOR and not Major…ha! I’m still trying to get the “Major” eraticated off our property up here on the moountain, as you well know.
    The view pool you fixed is weathering nicely! talk soon…

    1. Oh, Yes, Pear Street looks out over the top of the Rome News building across Glenn Milner Blvd, and on to the river.

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