How to Install a Near Perfect Sod Job– Part Two

21 steps to installing a perfect sod job This is part two of a series. To start at the beginning click here for Near Perfect Sod Job—part one. This article is written in answer to many questions about sod installation. In the entire article you will find 21 steps to installing a good sod job. A good beginning is the key to laying the sod. I always try to find the longest straight line in the project and begin there. If you keep a straight line it reduces trimming and all of the pieces fit. To begin, don’t worry about any curves, they will be trimmed out later.

The best start for the sod job is a straight line. The pieces should be placed as tightly together as you can get them.

The best start for the sod job is a straight line. The pieces should be placed as tightly together as you can get them.

When starting the second line of sod, set the pieces in so that the seams will hit the middle of those in the center row. It’s kind of like laying bricks. The piece on the right shown in this picture will be pulled up snug to the offset piece on the left. Don’t worry about the overhang, it will be trimmed off later.

The best start for the sod job is a straight line. The pieces should be placed as tightly together as you can get them.

The best start for the sod job is a straight line. The pieces should be placed as tightly together as you can get them.

Pay attention to sprinkler heads and any other underground items that need to stick up. Go ahead and deal with these items as you go. It’s easier that way

Be sure to deal with sprinkler heads as you come to them. It's much easier at this point

Be sure to deal with sprinkler heads as you come to them. It’s much easier at this point

Here’s what the sprinkler head should look like after the sod is installed:

I like to take a razor knife and carefully trim the grass around the sprinkler head. Doing it as you go makes the job easier

I like to take a razor knife and carefully trim the grass around the sprinkler head. Doing it as you go makes the job easier

There are a number of tools to be used for trimming sod. Here is my collection. I have butcher knives, box cutters, and a hatchet. I try to keep them sharp.

Cutting tools for trimming sod

When trimming curves and other spaces in the new sod, you will find a need for several different kinds of cutting tools

Some people like to trim sod with a hatchet—especially in open areas.

A hatchet works well to trim sod in an open area if you have a strong arm

A hatchet works well to trim sod in an open area if you have a strong arm

My preference for trimming sod is a box cutter knife with a clean, sharp blade.  This tool is excellent for trimming to the concrete edge.

A razor knife (or box cutter) is an ideal tool for trimming newly installed sod next to

A razor knife (or box cutter) is an ideal tool for trimming newly installed sod next to concrete borders

While laying and trimming the sod, we try to use the pieces cut from one spot to fill another spot. It’s kind of like a jig saw puzzle. Figuring the pieces out is also fun – on a certain level.

Use scraps from the sod trimming to fill open spaces--just like a jigsaw puzzle.

Use scraps from the sod trimming to fill open spaces–just like a jigsaw puzzle.

After the sod is laid and trimmed it should be watered enough to moisten it but not to get it really wet. When it is moist the roller should be run over it several times. This will mash the sod pieces down so that the roots will come in good contact with the ground and it will also make the job smooth.

Running a water filled roller over the sod makes it smooth and nice. It also mashes the sod roots down on the ground.

Running a water filled roller over the sod makes it smooth and nice. It also mashes the sod roots down on the ground.

The final part of the job is to water the sod well and then stand back and admire your handiwork. The seams between the pieces will grow together in a week or two.

The final task of the sod job is to water and then stand back and admire the finished product.

The final task of the sod job is to water and then stand back and admire the finished product.

You should water the newly installed grass every day for 3-4 days and then every other day for a week or so. At this point, the roots should be growing into the ground (you can lift a corner and check it). Once the grass starts growing, watering well once or twice a week should suffice—it all depends on the weather. As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?   Thanks for stopping by to see John the Plant Man.

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: How to Install a Near Perfect Sod Job. Part one | Johntheplantman's stories, musings, and gardening.
  2. Bob Hicks
    Aug 04, 2013 @ 09:57:59

    Very good job, John. I think the water-filled roller phase is surely one of the most important of all because the ultimate level/smoothness seems to become more difficult to achieve unless done at the beginning of the job. Not mentioned is the importance of a good Mexican. Bob

    _____

    From: Johntheplantman’s stories, musings, and gardening. [mailto:comment-reply@wordpress.com] Sent: Sunday, August 04, 2013 9:20 AM To: remhicks@comcast.net Subject: [New post] How to Install a Near Perfect Sod Job- Part Two

    John Schulz posted: “21 steps to installing a perfect sod job This is part two of a series. To start at the beginning click here for Near Perfect Sod Job-part one. This article is written in answer to many questions about sod installation. In the entire article you will fi”

    Reply

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