I had three calls today to let me know that the Japanese beetles had made their appearance. The last message was a text from my good friend Randolph who wanted to know how to get the pesky beetles that were eating up his crape myrtles.

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Japanese beetles in the Southern U.S can wreak havoc on plants such as roses and Crape myrtles. They don’t stay around long but they eat a lot

I started to explain the process to him but then I decided to get my friend Johntheplantman to write an article with pictures. Here’s how you do it.

Ace Hardware sold me a sprayer for around ten dollars. That’s reasonable and it serves my purposes. Here it is:

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An inexpensive pump sprayer. Always clean and rinse the sprayer before using it on plants. Be careful

The most effectivechemical I have found for these beetles is Liquid Sevin, which is an easy to spray version of the old fashioned Sevin dust that has been used by farmers and gardeners for many years. Liquid Sevin is one of the safest insecticides on the market, but be sure to wear eye and face protection when applying it.

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Liquid Sevin is a relatively safe insecticide and it works on the beetles. Be sure to wear safety glasses and face protection.

Most, but not all, sprayers have an adjustable nozzle similar to the one shown in the picture below. The expensive sprayers have a brass nozzle while some of the other sprayers have strange nozzles that won’t work. Here’s my nozzle:

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nozzle on cheap sprayer. tighten for wide spray, loosen for distance

The nozzle may be twisted to set a spray pattern. Here is a medium spray pattern

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A medium spray pattern

If you tighten the nozzle, the spray pattern becomes finer and wider.

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Tighten the nozzle to increase the fan

And if you loosen the nozzle the spray pattern will become more concentrated and will shoot for a greater distance. I used this spray pattern for a good picture but you may with to experiment and you will find that if it is set “just so,” it will look like a high-powered water gun and shoot 20 feet or more.

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Loosen the nozzle and experiment until you get a long, narrow stream. This will reach way up on the crape myrtle or other tall plants.

So mix the Liquid Sevin according to directions and set your sprayer. (Disclaimer: If You are against the use of this method of control, you may wish to get a Japanese beetle trap. If either of these procedures hurt your sensitivities in any way, I’m so sorry.)

Thanks for visiting John the plant man. Tell your friends or share it on Face Book.

Published by John P.Schulz

I lost my vocal cords a while back due to throat cancer. The laryngectomy sent me on a quest to find and learn to use my new, altered voice. I am able to talk now with a really small and neat new prosthesis. My writing reflects what I have learned in my search for a voice. My site johnschulzauthor.com publishes a daily motivational quote and a personal comment. I write an article a week for my blog, johntheplantman.com which deals with a lot of the things that I do in the garden. I am also the author of Requiem for a Redneck and the new Redemption for a Redneck--novels portraying the lives and doings of folks around the north Georgia hills. I have an English Education degree from the University of Georgia and very happily married to the lovely Dekie Hicks. You may enjoy my daily Quotes and Notes at http://johnschulzauthor.com/

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2 Comments

  1. I am pleased that these beetles are not a problem here. Crape myrtles really do not have many problems. Mildew is problem among those that do not get pruned aggressively enough.

    1. Actually, we don’t have many problems here, either. The beetles aren’t really that bad a problem but a lot of my ocd clients freak out about it.

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