A Second Try for a Deer Proof Hillside Planting.

The driveway to the Hubbard house that I wrote about last week is over a half a mile long and it meanders up a rather steep hill through a minimally well-kept wooded area. The drive is delightful but there is one hill, on the left, right around a bend, that really needed to look nice (that’s a polite way of calling it ugly). I have a funny story about that area, also. Here’s a picture (If you look hard you may be able to make out eight or ten clumps of daylilies, the rest is weeds):

The are waiting for their lunch. What will johnthepantman do?

The are waiting for their lunch. What will johnthepantman do?

Patsy and I had talked about this area about fifteen years ago and we decided that it would look nice planted in daylilies. I found a good source for bare-root daylily divisions of many varieties and we planted 700 of them. Now, in my book, planting 700 daylilies is making quite a statement. We were happy because we all knew that we had done something special. I will never forget what happened.

A couple of days after planting the daylilies the phone rang. It was Patsy. “Where are my plants?” she asked. I hurried up to the house in a panic to find, to my dismay, that the deer had eaten the daylilies, roots and all. There was nothing left but pine straw and deer poop. It reminded me of a quote from The Hobbit, “It does not do to leave a sleeping dragon out of your calculations.”

We have talked about planting the hill again off and on over the years but mostly we have ignored it. After thinking about it for a long time we decided to use a trailing “Blue Pacific” juniper and accent it with a planting of ‘prostate plum yew.’ I found an article about the plum yew that you may enjoy, “beloved conifer” (click here)

plum yew, (cephalotaxus) is a good choice for a garden where there is a deer population

plum yew, (cephalotaxus) is a good choice for a garden where there is a deer population

Before planting the project I studied the possibilities of irrigation. I knew that once these plants were grown in they would be hardy enough to get by on their own and I always try to work in a cost effective manner, so I decided to use micro misters. The drip irrigation pipe is inexpensive in 500 foot rolls and it took almost four of them to get from the water source to the end of the area where the planting would be. We kept digging to a minimum by only making a short run across a grassy area (which we buried) and then ran the rest of the pipe down the hill on the edge of the woods, fastening it with sod staples

drip irrigation line is cheap and efficient.

drip irrigation line is cheap and efficient.

In case you are interested in the mister irrigation system, I wrote an article about it, Click Here for “installing a micro-mister system for your flower beds”. Here is a picture of a misting nozzle in operation. I really like these.

A micro-mister spray head. inexpensive and efficient

A micro-mister spray head. inexpensive and efficient

I went to see my favorite grower and bought a hundred juniper and fifty of the plum yew.

blue pacific junipers and plum yew

blue pacific junipers and plum yew

A week before the planting I sprayed all of the weeds with glyphosphate. On a job like this I like to use some precision for the layout so I used a tape measure, a three foot spacing stick, and my wonderful paint gun to mark the proper planting spots. We decided to use three inverted triangles of the plum yew with the juniper as a border. It should grow out beautifully.

A marking paint gun is invaluable for laying out plantings.

A marking paint gun is invaluable for laying out plantings.

The plants were carefully installed on the hillside using Osmocote in the holes for a time-release fertilizer. We finished it off with 35 bales of pine straw and turned on the water. All was well. The plants were still there the next day.

Blue Pacific juniper and plum yew on a hillside is as close as one can come to deer proof.

Blue Pacific juniper and plum yew on a hillside is as close as one can come to deer proof.

Thank you for visiting John the Plant Man

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

Build a Christmas Tree Watering Funnel

Poor Sweetie. She loves her Christmas tree but it’s wide and bushy and I found her trying to figure out how to get water into the Christmas tree stand.  John the Plant Man to the rescue

I found poor Sweetie down on her knees wondering how she would get water to the base of the Christmas tree

I found poor Sweetie down on her knees wondering how she would get water to the base of the Christmas tree

I waited around for a while to see what she would do and I walked in to see her perplexed.

"What do I do? This is getting to be complicated"

“What do I do? This is getting to be complicated”

So, I went to Ace Hardware and got a plastic funnel and a roll of Christmas Duct tape. It was rather difficult to find Christmas colored Duct tape but it was there. I found a piece of ¾ pvc pipe in my irrigation left overs.

A funnel, red duct tape, and a piece of pipe should do the job

A funnel, red duct tape, and a piece of pipe should do the job

Nothing like duct tape and pvc pipe. I couldn’t figure out anywhere to use WD-40 though, or I would of.

There's nothing like a bit of duct tape and a piece of pvc pipe.

There’s nothing like a bit of duct tape and a piece of pvc pipe.

It didn’t take much to find the hole in the Christmas tree stand that was meant for adding water

I thought I saw a hole in the Christmas tree stand made just for this here pipe.

I thought I saw a hole in the Christmas tree stand made just for this here pipe.

It worked!! Sweetie can add water to the Christmas tree easily. The only thing I have yet to figure out is how to keep from getting too much water.  In case you’re wondering, Dekalb is the name of a hybrid corn and it is also Sweetie’s name—the one they get “Dekie” from.

It works and Sweetie is happy. Now I can go back to solving the Middle East crisis.

It works and Sweetie is happy. Now I can go back to solving the Middle East crisis.

Thanks for visiting John the Plant Man. Remember the next time you want a good read you need to try “REQUIEM FOR A REDNECK”, a kindle ebook from Amazon that features John the Plant Man with his Georgia mountain friends. It’s quite the adventure. Check it out, buy a copy, and tell ALL your friends about it.

Preparing for Planting a Shady Border Flower Garden—part one of a series

Judy Kerns Well, a Facebook friend from Darwin, Ohio asked me to do a series of articles on shade gardening. This was good timing for me because I had been studying the border of the yard that I became involved with after getting married a year ago and moving in with my wonderful wife, Dekie. It all worked together. Even though it was over a hundred degrees and a Saturday, I felt good and motivated and my friend Adrian wanted to help so we started putting the project together. I had a lot to work with, too. I had already sprayed the area to get rid of the weeds. Here’s Dekie in her yard for the ‘before’ picture:

shade garden preparation, 'before'  picture

shade garden preparation, ‘before’ picture

One of the first problems associated with planting in the shade is that the soil is usually compacted and full of roots from the trees and shrubs that cause the shade in the first place. The second problem is that these trees and shrubs drink up all the water. I decided that for success with the project, I would install a low volume watering system from the start. This took about two hours but I had already bought the parts which would add a couple more hours to the project. Here’s a picture of the problem. You can see the offending root and the black irrigation pipe:

Roots and compacted dirt are main problems in building a shade garden

Roots and compacted dirt are main problems in building a shade garden

I knew that if I tried to run a tiller or something like that, I would run into problems with roots and rocks. Messing with that would take the entire day, and because I believe in the KISS theory (“keep it simple, stupid), I brought in a lot of compost and raised the areas where I will plant the flowers. The technique is easy, cheap, and it works well. The mounds of compost will be raked out to the proper shape.

add a pile of good dirt or compost to plant in for success in most shady areas

add a pile of good dirt or compost to plant in for success in most shady areas

I like the moisture holding features of cypress mulch much more than pine straw. The cypress chips seem to be cost effective because even though they cost more to start with, they last much longer. The chips also do a good job of holding the compost in place and they turn into dirt when they rot out. Lowe’s had a “cypress blend” for $2.25 per bag and I got twenty of them. Here’s one of the prepared areas. I had turned on the irrigation system prior to raking out the compost so I would be sure that all of it would be watered.

shade garden --rake out the planting area and mulch with cypress chips.

shade garden –rake out the planting area and mulch with cypress chips.

Here is a picture of the border after I installed the chips. It looks a lot better already. I often tell clients that their yard needs “definition.” Definition sure did help the area here. It’s the first of July and I know it is late in the season, but I’m going to plant flowering annuals all along the border and then use every grower’s trick I have learned over the last 35 years to make them flourish and shine.

Notice that Sweetie was hiding in the house when I took this picture. It was 110 outside.

Notice that Sweetie was hiding in the house when I took this picture. It was 110 outside.

I spent last week repairing irrigation systems for people and I spent a lot of time driving from job to job and to lots of stores for parts. I really wanted a lot of impatiens but they just didn’t seem to be available. I didn’t quit, though and I ended up with a couple of flats of plants that really needed attention. They were all wilted an root bound, but a little care and water is bringing them back. I found green leafed begonias and a few other things that I can use. There are some nice coleus that will add a tall background.  I would like to get a few caladiums but they’re still pretty high priced right now. I will probably plant hostas for next year. Actually, right now I’m just playing—but I know it will look good when I get finished.

Collected plants for the shady border flower bed

Collected plants for the shady border flower bed

I plan to add to the shade gardening articles for the next two or three weeks. Stay tuned, or better yet, go to the top right hand corner of this article and sign up to get John The Plant Man sent straight to your email whenever I post an article.

AND REMEMBER

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

If you want a consultation in your yard in N.W. Georgia, send me an email at wherdepony@bellsouth.net

Install an automatic micro mister irrigation system for your flower beds.

 This morning my wife asked, “What’s the blog article about today?” I told her that I was going to tell about a micro mister. She said, “Ooooh, I want one of those. Could I carry him around in my shirt pocket?” I exasperatedly told her that I was talking about an easy to install and relatively inexpensive watering system for flower beds and pots.

I’ve been using this system for several years, and I have found myself using it more and more these days. I put in a nice system for Mabel Milner the other day and I thought I should share it. All of the parts for this project came from the Home Depot irrigation department.

I measured from the faucet on the house around the beds and decided that a hundred foot roll of drip irrigation tubing would do the job.

A roll of drip irrigation tubing

A roll of drip irrigation tubing

We next laid the pipe out in the general area of where we would want the watering heads. This tubing doesn’t need to go in a deep ditch. It does well just under the ground, or, in most cases, we tuck it up under the pine straw or other mulch. The open end of the tubing, away from the faucet is sealed up by bending it and using a ‘figure eight closer’ (not pictured). It can also be closed by folding it over and taping it with a waterproof electrical tape.

drip irrigation tubing laid out for installation

drip irrigation tubing laid out for installation

Micro tubing is attached to the drip tubing with a coupling. The coupling may be pushed into the drip pipe by hand or you may wish to use a pair of pliers. After the first one or two, it’s easy. You will probably want to put these stakes about ten feet apart. A bit of experimentation is usually called for.

micro tubing attached to drip pipe with coupling

micro tubing attached to drip pipe with coupling

The tubing is hooked up to a special stake that will hold a special nozzle. The stakes cost 99 cents.

mister stake attached to micro tubing

mister stake attached to micro tubing

I like to use the ½ circle nozzles. They cost about $1.25 and they even have a flow adjuster. These nozzles are screwed into the top of the pipe on the stake.

micro spray half circle nozzles

micro spray half circle nozzles

The item in the picture below is an adapter that features a hose thread hook up, a pressure reducer, a back flow preventer, and an adapter to fasten on the drip tubing. All that for about ten dollars!

pressure reducer and back flow preventer adapter for drip irrigation

pressure reducer and back flow preventer adapter for drip irrigation

I found a wonderful, easy to install, easy to program battery operated control clock from Orbit. This controller will cut the water on, run it as long as is desired, and then cut the water off. The timer may be set with intervals of one to several days between waterings. I like it and it’s a bargain for about $30.00.

Orbit battery irrigation controller on a faucet

Orbit battery powered irrigation controller on a faucet

I turned on the water and got this picture of the nozzle in action. Those hydrangeas are going to think they “done died and went to Heaven.” (as my redneck friends would say). There is a limit to the number of sprayers that may be put on a “circuit” I think that I was able to get about 10 of them on this one. The water pressure is low in Mabel’s neighborhood. You will need to just install a few and see what happens. Next week I will show you how to divide your irrigation project into different circuits.

micro sprayer in action

micro sprayer in action

As I was leaving, I got a picture of these begonias being watered. They will love it and will thrive. I think the micro misters do a much better job than hand watering.

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

If you want a consultation in your yard in N.W. Georgia, send me an email at wherdepony@bellsouth.net

Weed free garden paths and moving a water faucet.

 I didn’t install this lovely vegetable garden, but Nancy asked us to do a little tweaking. I think the main problem was weeds in the pathway, but there was more to be done. The raised beds had settled and were covered with weeds, so we spent quite a bit of time pulling the weeds and then adding several inches of compost to raise the height of the growing medium. Here’s the overview:

A designer vegetable garden in progress

A designer vegetable garden in progress

On what I think is an amusing note, I forgot the camera on the first day and with my type of step by step description, there’s no going back. Added to that, Dekie had changed the camera settings to black and white for some of her art work—and I didn’t notice. It should be interesting. We decided to put landscape fabric in the pathways to help control the weeds. Notice the corner fastened by staples furnished with the fabric. When we ran out of staples, we used large nails to hold the fabric down.

Installing landscape fabric for weed control in garden pathways.

Installing landscape fabric for weed control in garden pathways.

It took a lot of cutting and fitting to get it just right, but when finished, the fabric job looked like this:

landscape fabric installed and fastened with pins

landscape fabric installed and fastened with pins

The person who did the initial installation had put a faucet down in the ground inside the center bed. This was hard to get to, plants grew over it and hid it in the growing season, and the location was just totally unsatisfactory. We decided to move it to a better location.

garden faucet in the wrong place

garden faucet in the wrong place

I decided that we would leave the faucet in the ground to be used as a shut off valve in the winter. This seemed to be the easiest and most effective manner for the hookup. We dug out around the faucet

step one in moving a faucet

step one in moving a faucet

I bought an adaptor to change the hose thread on the faucet to standard pipe threads. FHT=Female hose threads, FIP=female pipe threads.

I needed to change the direction of the pipe, so I used a ¾ street ell. Notice that the threads are wrapped with Teflon tape to keep the joint from leaking.

street ell with teflon tape

street ell with teflon tape

The street ell installed

Adapting garden faucet to pvc pipe

Adapting garden faucet to pvc pipe

I added a 90 degree elbow and turned it toward the direction the pipe would run.

add an elbow and twist to the right direction

add an elbow and twist to the right direction

Here’s the pipe in the ground running to the fence.

moving a garden faucet. pipe layout

moving a garden faucet. pipe layout

The faucet is installed (using Teflon tape) and the pipe is fastened to the fence post with zip ties.

move a garden faucet. finished project

move a garden faucet. finished project

Here’s a picture of the fabric and plumbing installed:

designer veggie garden with fabric and faucet relocated. Ready to add cypress mulch

designer veggie garden with fabric and faucet relocated. Ready to add cypress mulch

We talked about all sorts of coverings for the pathways and decided on cypress wood chips. We spread the chips and were very happy with the results. It took 50-2 cubic foot bags of cypress chips

Designer vegetable garden with weed free pathway of cypress mulch

Designer vegetable garden with weed free pathway of cypress mulch

Now, all Nancy has to do is add plants and water. Yay. (I’ll check the color settings before writing another post)

Click here to find more tips on working with pvc pipe

I hope you enjoyed the article. I’ll bet you will also enjoy my novel

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

The boiler drain–An easier outdoor faucet for older gardeners

The boiler drain–An easier outdoor faucet for older gardeners

 I have found over the years that there comes a time in a gardener’s life when simple things become more difficult. One of my clients, Micky, is an amazing gardener with a good sense of design and a feel for plants that allows her to grow any plant successfully. She has a beautiful yard and a small greenhouse to keep plants in over the winter. I love the view from her back deck:

Micky's beautiful back yard from the deck

Micky’s beautiful back yard from the deck

In the years since her husband died, Micky has developed a neat system for watering her plants. She didn’t want to continually drag hoses all over the place so she has carefully run a number of hoses under the perimeter mulched beds to strategic locations where they hook up to sprinklers in separate beds.  This way, all she would have to do is hook up a hose to the outdoor faucet and turn the water on.  This was all right for a while, but a year ago, I watched as she showed me her watering rituals and I noticed how hard it was getting for her to make her way through the shrubbery to the wall faucet and to change the hoses.  Over the years her fingers have become twisted for one reason or another, and she had to use a pair of pliers to tighten the connections.  I thought of an easier way. I used a hose adaptor to hook pvc pipe to the faucet and then ran a pipe under the deck to the railing at the steps. I put in a series of faucets (the proper name of this is a “hose bib”) so that we could hook up each of the hoses and she could turn on whichever one she wanted.  It looked like this:

outdoor faucets raised to deck level

outdoor faucets raised to deck level

Micky was delighted with this system because she no longer had to walk through the shrubbery or switch hoses around. All she had to do was turn on a faucet. Problem solved? Nope. She called up this spring to tell me that one of the faucet handles had broken and when I showed up to see about fixing it, I noticed that she was having a hard time turning the water on. A hose bib works with compression, and she was having trouble turning the water on and off. I felt bad when I saw her struggling to turn the handles with her bent fingers. I found that she was once again having to use pliers to do the job.

handles on hose bibs are hard to turn

handles on hose bibs are hard to turn

Another problem was that sometimes her yard man would leave the water running and she wouldn’t know it until there was a puddle in the yard.  I went to the Home Depot plumbing department to find a solution.  I believe in the “KISS” principle—“Keep it simple, stupid” and I searched for a solution that was simple, cost effective, and workable.  I found it. I decided to use a “boiler drain” which, as opposed to the hose bib which works on compression, works with a ball valve and operates with a simple quarter-turn of the handle.

The boiler drain makes an easy to use outdoor faucet

The boiler drain makes an easy to use outdoor faucet

I worked the mechanism and decided that this would definitely do the trick. Here’s the boiler drain without the tag.

There are also no washers to wear out in a boiler drain

There are also no washers to wear out in a boiler drain

I removed the hose bibs and proceeded to replace them with the boiler drains. Teflon tape is applied to the threads to keep the joint from leaking.  I always use teflon tape when threading any plumbing fitting. It really works.

teflon tape keeps plumbing joints from leaking

teflon tape keeps plumbing joints from leaking

The teflon tape is easy to apply and the prepared threads look like this when finished

teflon tape applied properly to avoid leaking

teflon tape applied properly to avoid leaking

The boiler drains have been installed. One of the things we immediately noticed was that Micky could now see if any water was turned on by just looking at the faucet. The sideways handles are off and the vertical handle indicates that the water is on.

easy to see which faucet is turned on. Sideways is on, up and down is off

easy to see which faucet is turned on. Sideways is on, up and down is off

Micky grinned as she reached down and turned the handle a quarter-turn. She said, “That’s easy, I love it.”

Much better. Easy to work this faucet.

Much better. Easy to work this faucet.

One of the hoses is hooked up to a pistol grip nozzle for cleaning purposes. It works just fine and there’s no bending over or crawling through the bushes to turn it on.

No dragging hoses, no bending over. Wow!

No dragging hoses, no bending over. Wow!

And here’s a not too good picture of the faucet hookup. I installed a boiler drain for any necessary hose hookup. In the winter, all that needs doing is to turn off the wall mounted faucet and open the ball valve at the bottom of the line to drain the pipes.

hook up detail. Note the ball valve for draining pipes in winter

hook up detail. Note the ball valve for draining pipes in winter

There’s at least one problem solved. Can you think of any other things that need to be made easier for older gardeners?

******

You may wish to visit two related articles:

1. Click here for directions for building a vegetable garden sprinkler

2. Click here for directions for building a really nice portable sprinkler

Would you like a consultation with johntheplantman in your yard? Contact John Schulz BY EMAIL

 These articles are brought to you by John P. Schulz, author of the novel, Requiem for a Redneck

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

An over the top vegetable garden sprinkler and a Father’s Day present

Over the top vegetable garden irrigation—A well received Father’s Day present.

 

The garden got planted late this year-probably because of the preparations for the  wedding at the farm on May 14. About a month prior to that date, though, in a conversation with The Gentleman Farmer, Bob Hicks, who would soon be my father in law, I heard him say, “I wish I could figure out a way to irrigate my garden in a way that I didn’t have to get all wet and muddy moving a sprinkler around.” 

 

The Gentleman Farmer's vegetable garden--planted late but holds much promise

The Gentleman Farmer’s vegetable garden–planted late but holds much promise

 

Well, let me tell you, I latched on to that one. I could show off my irrigation skills and Sweetie and I would not have to worry about a Father’s Day present when we got back from our trip, so off I went to my friendly Home Depot irrigation department.  I chose the Orbit gear drive sprinkler head because of the ease of adjustment and because I have had really good results with it in the past.

Orbit gear drive sprinkler head, covers distances of 40 to 50 feet according to pressure

Orbit gear drive sprinkler head, covers distances of 40 to 50 feet according to pressure

I decided that if I made provisions for draining the system in the winter, I could just lay the pipe up against the fence on top of the ground. This was done with ¾ pvc pipe

Pipe along the garden perimeter will need to be drained in the winter

Pipe along the garden perimeter will need to be drained in the winter

I put a 90 degree elbow in the corners and installed a riser with a tee

Pvc pipe showing corner and irrigation riser for vegetable garden

Pvc pipe showing corner and irrigation riser for vegetable garden

I cut the riser to the right height and glued on a ¾ male adapter. I used zip ties to fasten the riser firmly to the fence.

3/4 pvc male adapter ready for the Orbit gear drive sprinkler head

3/4 pvc male adapter ready for the Orbit gear drive sprinkler head

The Orbit sprinkler head comes with a well written instruction sheet, a set of different nozzles, and an adjustment tool.  I didn’t read the instructions because 1) I’m a guy, and 2) because I’ve used these heads before. If you’re not familiar with the Orbit head, you may wish to at least glance at the directions. I set the heads to a 45 degree arc so that it stopped at each fence line.  The mounted head looks like this:

Gear drive sprinkler head mounted to fence for vegetable garden

Gear drive sprinkler head mounted to fence for vegetable garden

 

I installed a ¾ swivel hose adaptor to a piece of pipe that was installed in a convenient place near the faucet by the barn.  I hooked up the hose and turned on the water.

pvc pipe and swivel 3/4 by female swivel hose adaptor hooked to a garden hose for the sprinkler

pvc pipe and swivel 3/4 by female swivel hose adaptor hooked to a garden hose for the sprinkler

Oops, I had thought that I could get by with two heads in opposite corners of the garden, but I hadn’t figured right. It didn’t quite cover.  I had brought three heads with me, though, and so I added a third one.  This did much better, so I decided to add a fourth head

 When I added the fourth head, though, I didn’t have quite enough pressure to drive all of them, so we decided that we need to add a ball valve at the top of each riser so that we could run two heads at the time.  Sometimes it takes a little experimentation to get things right.  The four heads running all at once did a pretty good job, but running them two at a time will do an excellent job.  I assume that Bob Hicks and his trusty farm manager, Scott have already installed the valves.  If not, I will make a trip to the farm and do it next week.

I had to get a picture of everyone standing in admiration and awe while watching the new system work.  The Gentleman Farmer said that now we would have vegetables for the whole family and then some.

My new wife, Dekie, and new in-laws, Bob and Micheline Hicks greet the new sprinkler with awe, amazement, and admiration. Happy Father's Day, Papa

My new wife, Dekie, and new in-laws, Bob and Micheline Hicks greet the new sprinkler with awe, amazement, and admiration. Happy Father’s Day, Papa

Happy Father’s Day, Bob, from John and Dekie.

 ****************

To see an article on The Gentleman Farmer, CLICK HERE

 For an article on a wonderful portable sprinkler built from pvc pipe and irrigation parts from Home Depot, CLICK HERE

 Would you like a consultation with johntheplantman in your yard? Contact John Schulz BY EMAIL

 These articles are brought to you by John P. Schulz, author of the novel, Requiem for a Redneck .

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

****************

Blog Stats

  • 275,098 hits

Archives

Now available as an ebook at Amazon–read it on your Kindle

Requiem for a Redneck--A novel by John P. Schulz

Check out more adventures of John the plant man in this hilarious yet sensitive award winning novel

Grown Man Now

Billy Schulz, Grown Man Now

My favorite blog by Dr. Jane Schulz and Billy

June 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
%d bloggers like this: