How to Install a Near Perfect Sod Job. Part one

21 steps to a perfect sod job

For Part Two of this article, Click here

Laying sod properly is almost an art form. Some people merely throw the sod at the ground and stomp on it but like any other job worth doing, time, care, and patience pay off.  When my client purchased the house, this bed had been planted with a collection of perennial vines and had become weed-eaten and completely unmanageable. We decided that a clean installation of Zoysia sod would be the answer.

So we chopped everything down with a weed eater, raked it clean, and sprayed with a weed killer. We watched the area for a few months to make sure all of the weeds and vines had been eradicated. Finally, the site was ready.

The first step in preparing for a sod job is to remove all unwanted vegetation

The site has been cleared of any vegetation that would compete with the sod

One of my favorite tools is my “paint gun.” I used it to very carefully mark the sod borders, sprinkler heads, and anything else I didn’t want to mess up. After marking the borders, we measured for the sod and ordered it.

Sod borders marked for the job

I love using my paint gun to mark areas of consideration in a landscaping job

We must be sure to find and mark all sprinkler heads.  It is much easier than to repair them later.

Sprinkler heads are easily damaged. Be careful

Mark anything that may be broken or damaged by a tiller or other equipment

We run a tiller over the area lightly, cutting down no more than 2-3 inches. The tiller is run in a manner that will pulverize the top of the soil.

Use the tiller to lightly pulverize the top 2-3 inches of the soil

Use the tiller to lightly pulverize the top 2-3 inches of the soil

When finished with the tiller, a yard rake is used to smooth out any hills and valleys. This is the first raking.

using a rake to prepare for a sod installation

The rake is one of the most important tools on the job.

After getting the tilled area reasonably smooth, we run a water filled roller over the site. The roller will show high and low spots which may then be raked over and then rolled again. Time and care spent on this job will pay off in the finished job. I try to get the area as smooth as the top of a pool table.

Using a water filled roller to prepare a site for sod

A water filled sod roller is run over the soil to pack it as well as to show high and low spots.

It is important to raise and adjust any sprinkler heads. The top of the head should be 3/4 of an inch above the finished soil surface. Pack the soil firmly when finished

Adjust sprinklers to the correct height before laying sod

Adjust sprinklers to the correct height before laying sod

I had measured the area to be sodded and came up with a little over 1200 square feet. I like to purchase Zoysia sod cut in sections of about one by two feet. These are delivered on pallets which hold 450 square feet of grass. So I needed three pallets. I can always find something to do with the left overs.  The guy from the sod farm is always nice about placing the pallets as close to the actual work site as possible.

sod delivery on site

The sod delivery man uses a ‘spider’ to place the pallets of sod for convenience.

Now it’s time to start putting the sod on the ground. Unless you’re a masochist this is at least a two man job.

hauling sod pieces in a wheelbarrow

I like to have one person hauling, one on his knees laying and fitting, and one more (me) taking care of the details.

I’ll be back with part two next week. The job turns out really nice.

For Part Two of this article, Click here

Thanks for visiting John The Plant Man.

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

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Tree forming-Landscaping from the inside out.

 

Using Bonsai techniques to prune and shape overgrown shrubs and trees in the landscape.

 I have always thought that a good landscape design should provide pleasing views from the inside out as well as just from the outside. A good landscape garden is a four dimensional “sculpture” that has height, depth, and width, but also has the elements of being viewed from inside. Another dimension has to do with the changing of the landscape sculpture with time.

 I have been studying two arborvitaes at the house on the mountain. They were cute little things when someone planted them there but over the years they had grown and were now blocking not only the pathway, but also the inside view of the garden from the window. I cut the tops out of the trees last year and continued studying. The arborvitaes were also inhibiting the growth and development of the Otto Luyken laurels at the base of the planting. Our choice was to either take out the trees or find another way to solve the problem. I chose “tree forming” Here are a couple of pictures of the initial problem: (I’ll start by showing the “before pics and finish the article with the “after” ones)

Overgrown arborvitae needs pruning because it blocks the view from inside

Overgrown arborvitae needs pruning because it blocks the view from inside

From the outside, one can see that the arborvitaes were taking over the walkway and the laurels. I next took the following pictures of the view from the inside:

view from inside blocked by overgrown shrubbery

view from inside blocked by overgrown shrubbery

The trees, including a large crape myrtle on the other side of the walkway were blocking the view of the distant mountain, and the arborvitae was blocking the side view of the flower beds.

can't see the flowers for the trees

can’t see the flowers for the trees

We started by cutting the lower limbs from the overgrown shrub, working our way up. One should proceed slowly with this because it is always possible to cut more limbs but not to put them back on.

begin the tree forming processs by cutting limbs from the bottom up

begin the tree forming processs by cutting limbs from the bottom up

The best way to get a good job in tree forming is to cut a little and then stand back and study the situation.

While pruning, stand back periodically to study the project

While pruning, stand back periodically to study the project

The plant now looks more like a tree. It no longer shades out the laurels and the view of the walkway. In a few months, we will trim the top to start the process of shaping it while it grows. I can envision it providing a canopy over the laurels and part of the walkway. If we keep the top cut, it will bush out and do just as the picture in my head dictates. We did the same to the arborvitae on the other side of the window.

turning a bush into a tree makes quite a difference

turning a bush into a tree makes quite a difference

We did some major surgery on a crape myrtle on the other side of the walk way that was also blocking the view and then we studied an overgrown yaupon tree further down the walkway.

We also need to shape up this yaupon holly tree, "before" picture

We also need to shape up this yaupon holly tree, “before” picture

When we finished shaping the yaupon tree, it looked like this:

Yaupon holly tree pruned to perfection

Yaupon holly tree pruned to perfection

The pruning had opened up the view of the walkway and made it much more open and pleasant.

The pruning process has opened up the view of the rock walkway and enhanced the comfort of walking through it.

The pruning process has opened up the view of the rock walkway and enhanced the comfort of walking through it.

It was now time to check out the “new view” from the inside of the house. Notice how we opened up the mountain vista from the big front window

The pruning has opened up the view of the mountain from the living room

The pruning has opened up the view of the mountain from the living room

And we can now see through the arborvitae to enjoy the flower beds on the walkway.

Now we can see the flower beds from inside the living room. It lets in a lot more light, too.

Now we can see the flower beds from inside the living room. It lets in a lot more light, too.

Keep in mind that you can use this tree form pruning  process on all sorts of trees and bushes. It really adds elegance to your landscape garden.

*******Related articles:

Pruning as an art form, the basics of pruning

Pruning and shaping an overgrown bonsai tree

How to start a bonsai

Renovating an overgrown landscape, part one

Renovating an overgrown landscape, part two

If you would like to have a landscaping consultation with John Schulz in the north Georgia area, you may send an email to, wherdepony@bellsouth.net

******************

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

Planting a flower bed with leftovers, or, “Happy wife, happy life”

Planting a flower bed with leftovers, or, “Happy wife, happy life”

 She said, “I want my yard to look like a landscaper lives here.”

I replied, “It does look like a landscaper lives here. Remember the cobbler’s shoes.”

 I plant a lot of flowers every spring.  Actually, I plant a lot of truckloads of flowers every spring.  This year was rather hectic because I had to plant flowers for all of my clients before our May 14 wedding which was followed by a two week honeymoon trip. When you consider the fact that I can’t really start planting until April 15, it looks like an impossible task.  I did it, though-mostly. Before leaving for two weeks, I placed all of my leftover plants in what I call my “hospital” and left instructions with my neighbor, Marilyn, to keep them watered.

 There is a flower bed in Dekie’s back yard that is in just the right place, separating the patio area from the rest of the yard. It was ugly, though, and grown over with all manner of iris, daylilies, poison ivy, and all manner of other stuff, including one calla lily plant which is a treasure. We dug out everything but the calla lily and mounded up lots of compost that I get from Mike Hutchins in Menlo, Ga. It looked like this:

Re working a flower bed with compost and an eclectic mixed border

Re working a flower bed with compost and an eclectic mixed border

The house was probably built during the late 1920s or 30s and has obviously been inhabited by numerous gardeners. Dekie said that when she moved in, she found rocks and bricks everywhere she looked or tried to dig. We decided that we would keep the tradition of the yard and use bricks and rocks that she had found for the borders. I had packed the back of the mini van with flowers and it looked like this:

Leftover plants in the white Dodge mini van

Leftover plants in the white Dodge mini van

I use the mounded compost for almost every flower bed installation.  It is quick, easy, and it “really, really works.” There’s just something about growing in a raised bed that I like. After the compost is piled up, the earthworms go to work, tilling the good dirt way down into the existing ground. I tell people they can stick pencils in this stuff and grow erasers. It is wonderful.

A flower bed prepared with a mound of compost

A flower bed prepared with a mound of compost

Dekie and Speck, the coon dog checked out all of the plants as they were unloaded. Speck had a wonderful time sniffing the fertilizer.

Dekie and the coon dog check out the flowers and fertilizer

Dekie and the coon dog check out the flowers and fertilizer

Around the end of June, it is sometimes hard to find the material that you want for a flower bed. I was rather fortunate the day before to have a client complain that the dragon wing begonias in her window boxes were getting too big, so I took them out and replaced them with smaller plants.  I had cut the tops out of the dragon wings and they were ready to go into the bed for the background. I love dragon wing begonias. They are, in my opinion, one of the finest flowering plants to come along in a long time.

Dragon wing begonia pruned and ready to plant

Dragon wing begonia pruned and ready to plant

Since the plants had been sitting around for well over a month, they had grown sort of tall and leggy. Dekie took on the careful task of pruning each plant so that it could branch out and strut its stuff.

Prune the leggy plants before planting even if it means losing a few flowers. You will be rewarded with many more.

Prune the leggy plants before planting even if it means losing a few flowers. You will be rewarded with many more.

When we cleaned out the bed, we were very careful to avoid disturbing the calla lily.  My mother taught me about callas and they are one of my favorite plants.

I love the way calla lilies grow and form clumps

I love the way calla lilies grow and form clumps

We laid the dragon wing begonias out and tried to be very particular because they grow rapidly and become rather large. They will make a wonderful background for the bed.

I like to lay out the background first. Dragon wing begonias will do fine.

I like to lay out the background first. Dragon wing begonias will do fine.

I had saved a few plants of white and purple angelonia.  We thought that they would go well between the dragon wings and the fibrous rooted begonias. This will make a terraced effect that is so nice to have. Since the plants had been in their containers for so long, we had to break up the roots so they will spread.

Break up the root balls to provide for better root development and, therefore, better plants.

Break up the root balls to provide for better root development and, therefore, better plants.

We set up an assembly line. I would dig the holes (which ain’t much trouble in that wonderful compost), Dekie would then drop in the time release fertilizer, and I would finish the planting. We were finished in very little time.

I always use time release fertilizer when planting

I always use time release fertilizer when planting

The planting was finished and my sweet wife was grinning. I will probably go back and mulch the bed with either cypress chips or pine straw, whichever gets left over first.

The flowers are planted. My new father in law said, "Happy wife, Happy life" I'm listening

The flowers are planted. My new father in law said, “Happy wife, Happy life” I’m listening

 It was time to clean up the pots for recycling and then to water the plants in. I planned to use my syphonex (which is a wonderful way to apply liquid fertilizer through a hose), but I thought this may just be a job for Sunday. I like to use liquid fertilizer along with the time release to “fine tune” the plants. I think I will introduce you to the syphonex next week. It is one of the best gardening tools I know of.

The syphonex is the best, easiest, and most accurate way I've found to apply liquid fertilizer through a hose.

The syphonex is the best, easiest, and most accurate way I’ve found to apply liquid fertilizer through a hose.

We set up the wonderful flower bed sprinkler. It is built out of pvc pipe with rain bird irrigation nozzles. If you want one, you can read about how to build it here

a handy home made sprinkler with pvc pipe and rain bird irrigation nozzles from Home Depot.

a handy home made sprinkler with pvc pipe and rain bird irrigation nozzles from Home Depot.

I’m learning about this married life. I liked the flower bed all right, but more than that, I really liked the smile on Sweetie’s face as she said, “Well, that’s a start”

********

You may also wish to check my article which tells about what happens when you prune a plant. See “The basics of pruning”

Would you like a consultation with johntheplantman in your yard? Contact John Schulz BY EMAIL

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

Renovating an overgrown landscape-part three

Renovating an overgrown landscape-part three of a series.

One of the lessons I learned the hard way in my years of building and rebuilding landscape projects has been to realize that the project will generate a lot of waste that must be dealt with.  During my initial talks with Holly (the client), I asked if the area had pick up services for such waste and she told me that we would have to cut it up and put it in special bags in order to put it out on the street.  I chuckled at that because I knew that there would be a lot of stuff and that the bags and the time to fill them would not be cost effective.  Since I was not familiar with the Atlanta area, I asked Holly if she would make some arrangements.

piles of leaves and cuttings from the renovation

piles of leaves and cuttings from the renovation

The site had been way over planted and then had been allowed to become overgrown.  As we pruned and cleaned, we piled the debris in a corner of the circular drive.  It grew and grew.

piles of cuttings and dead plants to be turned into compost

piles of cuttings and dead plants to be turned into compost

We ran out of room on the front drive and started piling the clippings and leaves on the lower parking area in the back yard. I wanted to have the piles in places that offered easy truck access.  It was sort of fun working around a 1970 Karman Ghia. Both of the piles got rather large.

Piling up landscape waste for removal

Piling up landscape waste for removal

Holly said that she had been pleased in the past with results from Angie’s List and that she liked reading the comments and reviews.  Well, let me tell you-Holly did a good job of finding someone to haul off the waste material.  While I was working and watching the pile grow, a nice looking man pulled up, got out of the car, and asked, “Are you John?”

His name was Ryan Tabb, owner of Peachtree Junk Removal.  Ryan is one of those people who I liked immediately.  He walked around with me and looked at all of the details involved with the waste removal.  He even noticed some old paint cans and told me that there was a special, environmentally friendly way of dealing with them.

Ryan gave Holly a reasonable bid price and had his truck at the site promptly on the day and time that he had promised.  I was impressed.  I was told that all of the biodegradable waste would be taken to a composting site and would be turned into something useful and eco friendly.  I liked that.  Ryan sent a giant truck with a lift gate and two delightful helpers, Jason and Ebie.

R to L, Jason and Ebie from Peachtree Junk Removal, with Santos and Victor Hugo

R to L, Jason and Ebie from Peachtree Junk Removal, with Santos and Victor Hugo

Everyone teamed up and loaded the truck.  One of the things I liked about Peachtree Junk Removal was that everyone was cheerful and worked hard.  No one complained when the job required two loads instead of one.  They turned waste removal into a pleasant experience.

The lift gate and a tarp were a big help

The lift gate and a tarp were a big help

Ryan called and told me that the weights at the dump site were 3300 pounds for the first load and 3800 pounds for the second.  That was a lot of pruning.  We were both surprised at the amount.

After the waste removal, we put out 150 bales of pine straw to make the yard shine.  I wasn’t able to get “after” pictures because the light wasn’t right when we got finished.  The next job on the yard will be to repair the sprinkler system and the 12 volt lighting.  After that, we will fill in a few places with new plants and seasonal color.  The series will continue in a couple of weeks.

***************

You may wish to see a previous article which explains the dynamics of plant pruning:

Pruning as an art form-the basics of pruning

February is also a good time for carefully shaping your Crape Myrtles.  Read about it in my article, Zen and the art of crape myrtle pruning

If you would like a consultation with John Schulz, Landscape Artist, in your yard, Please contact me by email

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

Renovating an overgrown landscape, part two of a series

Renovating an overgrown landscape-part two of a series

 The back yard of the house is dominated by a delightfully whimsical pool, jacuzzi, and a terraced deck.  The back side of the deck is bordered by a lovely brick retaining wall on two levels.  There are a lot of nice azaleas, sasanquas, and lorapetalums planted for interest and to form a screen.  Behind the screen is a pathway bordered on the back side with large hollies and a number of ailing hemlocks.  Atlanta seems to be a little far south for hemlocks.

 

 

There's a beautiful terraced brick retainer behind the lorapetalum

There’s a beautiful terraced brick retainer behind the lorapetalum

 

 

 I studied the overgrown lorapetalums.  Lorapetalums are rather nice with their purple blooms in the summer and their dark leaves.  They shape well, but they have spurts of rapid growth.  These plants are a good substitute for a privet or boxwood hedge and are very “tame.” This planting needed attention.

 

 

I wanted to see the brick retaining wall

I wanted to see the brick retaining wall

 

 

 

 The row of lorapetalums on the front row were too overgrown to be easily shaped into a low shrub in front of the brick wall, and the wall is nice looking.  I decided that It would be nice to be able to see the brick retaining wall through the plants so I turned them into a “tree form.” (see “tree forming” here) I was right, too in that I found garden lighting fixtures hidden in the lower beds.  I think that something like hosta, a low ground cover, or perhaps some summer impatiens would be nice planted in the area beneath these tree formed lorapetalums.

 

 

Tree form lorapetalums ready to grow out

Tree form lorapetalums ready to grow out

 

 

I “talked with” another row of lorapetalums on the upper level of the wall and “we” decided that they needed to be sheared into a hedge form to enhance the privacy and to add a feeling of seclusion to the pathway behind them. The pruned hedge looked like this:

 

 

A shaped lorapetalum hedge for privacy

A shaped lorapetalum hedge for privacy

 

 

Satisfied with the lorapetalums, I moved on to several plantings of overgrown and straggly gardenias.  I love gardenias and my client had commented on how delightful their fragrance was during the summer.  The gardenia plantings looked half way acceptable on top, but when I started poking around I found that it was all top growth.  Gardenias bloom on new growth and therefore may be pruned at any time of the year.  The pruning will increase the amount of new growth and will therefore provide more flowers.  Here’s what I was dealing with:

 

 

overgrown gardenias-yellow leaves denote a need for nutrients

overgrown gardenias-yellow leaves denote a need for nutrients

 

 

The idea in pruning gardenias is not to get a perfect shape but rather to open them up to allow light inside so that lower growth can develop.  The added light also reduces the development of fungal disease.  The shaping will also add strength to the weak, elongated branches.  Here’s a start.  You can see the lower growth trying to grow.

 

 

The gardenia's inner growth needs light.  The spindly branches need to be shortened for strength

The gardenia’s inner growth needs light. The spindly branches need to be shortened for strength

 

 

When cutting the gardenias, I am careful to study each cut and to cut in a manner that leaves a new shoot or branch intact and ready to grow.  This lower growth will develop rapidly with extra light and by not having to compete with the upper growth.  You will note a lot of yellow leaves on the plants.  The yellow is an indication of a lack of nutrition.  A good fertilizer and an application of epsom salts will color the leaves up rapidly as spring moves in. (click here for “choosing the right fertilizer”)

When pruning the gardenia, carefully cut just above new growth.

When pruning the gardenia, carefully cut just above new growth.

 

After finishing the gardenias, I studied my job for next week—removing old, dead, and damaged growth from the rhododendrons followed by a general cleanup.  After that I will study the overall project and decide on any fill in or additions that are necessary.  This job has really been a lot of fun. 

 

 

Time to take the dead and diseased growth out of the rhododendrons

Time to take the dead and diseased growth out of the rhododendrons

 

 

**********

You may wish to see a previous article which explains the dynamics of plant pruning: Pruning as an art form-the basics of pruning

 February is also a good time for carefully shaping your Crape Myrtles.  Read about it in my article, Zen and the art of crape myrtle pruning

 If you would like a consultation with John Schulz, Landscape Artist, in your yard, Please contact me by email

 

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

 

********

Renovating an overgrown landscape-part one of a series

Renovating an overgrown landscape-part one-tree forming.

 Today’s article begins a series on renovating an overgrown landscape planting.  I have been asked to turn an over planted and neglected landscape garden into a work of art.  We started this project the first week in February, 2011, and I was kicking myself for forgetting the camera on the first day.  I won’t forget it again.  Anyway, here is a picture of what we took out the first day with some untouched “jungle in the background.

 

 

Unwanted material in front of an untouched "jungle"

Unwanted material in front of an untouched “jungle”

 

 

 I really love it when I am asked to “fix” an overgrown landscape planting.  There’s something about getting in there and moving, removing, and pruning the plants to make sense of a mess that turns me on. After getting a basic start the first day and becoming familiar with the scope of the job, I decided to start with the overgrown hollies and sasanquas that blocked the front of the house.  The plants are healthy and I’m sure they were expensive when installed, and I didn’t want to remove them, just open them up and stop them from blocking the circular drive.  I decided to “tree form” them. Here is the “before” picture:

 

 

overgrown planting hiding the house

overgrown planting hiding the house

 

 

I would be dealing with a 15 foot overgrown holly

 

 

overgrown planting hiding the house

overgrown planting hiding the house

 

 

 

And dealing with two groups of overgrown sasanquas

 

 

overgrown sasanquas need a definitive shape for effect

overgrown sasanquas need a definitive shape for effect

 

 

 

I will use the 15 foot holly to show you how we turned a large “bush” into a “tree form.”  The first step is to study the plant and get a plan of approach.  We will start by removing the bottom limbs from the plant and moving from the bottom to the top.

 

 

begin the tree forming process by cutting lower limbs

begin the tree forming process by cutting lower limbs

 

 

 

I like to stop periodically to look at the progress from a distance.  This shot shows a start but also a need for a bit more work on the bottom and for trimming the lower perimeter of leaves.

 

 

While pruning, stand back and examine the progress every now and then

While pruning, stand back and examine the progress every now and then

 

 

 

I decided that a piece or two of the lower trunk grouping needed to go.  This was a job for the wonderful little bitty chain saw.

 

 

Cut off any of the larger trunks that don't look right.

Cut off any of the larger trunks that don’t look right.

 

 

 

The next part of the job was to get out the ladder and trim the top of the tree.  I couldn’t see the person on top of the ladder.  Please note that there is someone holding the ladder.  This is very important on any job.  You should never work from the top of a ladder without assistance.

 

 

Trim the top of the tree to a manageable height

Trim the top of the tree to a manageable height

 

 

 

After trimming the top and finishing up with a careful touch up with hand shears, the job is completed.  This tree will grow into a delightful canopy if maintained properly.  Look at how it opens up the planting area.  This tree form treatment is what I call, “turning a liability into an asset.”

 

 

The finished "tree form holly"

The finished “tree form holly”

 

 

 

The sasanquas had grown out over ornamental rocks, were choking a beautiful and expensive Japanese maple, and were blocking half of the driveway.  Here is a picture of the tree formed sasanquas.  We will remove the leaves and apply fresh pine straw when we finish working on all of the plants in the yard.

 

Turn overgrown sasanquas into tree forms

Turn overgrown sasanquas into tree forms

 

 

 I hope you enjoyed the show.  Try the “tree forming” technique on your own overgrown shrubbery—I call it “bonsai on steroids.”

**********

You may wish to see a previous article which explains the dynamics of plant pruning:

Pruning as an art form-the basics of pruning

 February is also a good time for carefully shaping your Crape Myrtles.  Read about it in my article, Zen and the art of crape myrtle pruning

 If you would like a consultation with John Schulz, Landscape Artist, in your yard,

Please contact me by email

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

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