Time: The Fourth Dimension in the Garden

Patsy Hubbard and I were looking around her “yard” the other day. She said, “It sure does look good this year.” I replied, “Yes, and just think, it only took thirty years.”

“I hope you are taking pictures.” She remarked and the more I thought about that remark, the more I thought that it would be nice to post some pictures.

Dragon wing begonia with mountainous background

Dragon wing begonia with mountainous background

As you can see from the picture above, the scope of the plantings mixed with the hilltop setting range from small details to large vistas. One of the best performing flowering accent plants has been the “Miss Huff” lantana. This reliable perennial has grown to the size of about five feet high and eight feet in diameter. It is totally deer-proof, also.

Miss Huff latana gets big but does its job well.

Miss Huff latana gets big but does its job well.

Here’s a detail of the lantana. If you plant it for yourself, be sure to leave plenty of room.

Flowers on Miss Huff lantana

Flowers on Miss Huff lantana

Maintaining this landscape garden calls for a lot of pruning—some of it on a ladder. I would say that we do an extended pruning/shaping three or four times a year. I liked this silhouette:

Carefully shaping trees and shrubs from a ladder.

Carefully shaping trees and shrubs from a ladder.

The walkways are on three major levels and are tied in so that they may be traveled without the need of stairs. It is an ideal ride for a motorized “scooter.” There is always something pretty, interesting, and constantly changing to look at.

A shady garden path

A shady garden path

I like to grow a mandevilla vine up to the top of the pool cabana every year. This one was purchased at Lowe’s this spring and was about three feet tall. I have tried keeping these plants inside during the winter but I have found that it is easier and cheaper to just buy a new one each spring.

A flowering mandevilla grows rapidly up a chain

A flowering mandevilla grows rapidly up a chain

I built this rock fountain about thirty years ago and it’s still doing fine. I love the way it offers a microcosm of the distant mountainous vistas.

The view of a small fountain extends to the distant mountains

The view of a small fountain extends to the distant mountains

The walkway to the main entrance of the home is bordered with begonias, angelonias, Knock Out roses, and crape myrtle among other plants and is fronted by a magnificent weeping cherry.

An entrance walkway with a view

An entrance walkway with a view

Even on the hottest days there is some relief to be found on the shady pathways.

A shady garden pathway

A shady garden pathway

This has been fun. I’ll try to find some more points of interest for next week.

Thank you for visiting John the Plant Man

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

After four years I finally figured out how to add a comment box to this blog. Let’s see if it works

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Preparing the garden for a tour, part 5 of a series.

 This is part five of a series devoted to getting a garden ready for the Rome, Ga. Junior Service League tour of gardens which will take place on April 28, 2012. To find the other articles of this series, CLICK HERE

 April 15. The season is progressing and we had a bit less than three weeks until the tour. The first thing on the agenda for a Tuesday morning was to take the cover off of the swimming pool. I was afraid to look, but when I did I saw that the water was a nice shade of green, but not as bad as it could have been. I have waited to open the pool until the multitude of wisteria blooms had finished falling.

 

The pool needs a bit of attention

The pool needs a bit of attention

 

Then, there was another issue in the form of some Schipp’s laurels that had been declining over a period of several years. I have worked on them for quite some time and they have just not responded. Time for them to go.

 

funky looking laurels need to go

funky looking laurels need to go

 

And we went to work. I waited until the end of the week to check items off my prodigious list. Here is the progress report:

 

 

The flower beds are all cleaned and furnished with fresh pine straw. They are now ready to plant but it is still a bit early to plant tender flowers in North Georgia, so I will wait until the final week before the tour.

 

flower beds with pine straw ready to plant

flower beds with pine straw ready to plant

 

I enjoyed the nice shapes of the plantings at the driveway entrance

 

well shaped plants at parking entrance

well shaped plants at parking entrance

 

 

We have worked for years shaping some dwarf yaupons as an entrance for a part of the front walkway. I’m very happy with the way they are looking now.

 

shaped yaupon holly for pathway border

shaped yaupon holly for pathway border

 

I still have a bit of work to do on the pool, but it’s starting to look good. We will get the water crystal clear next week.

 

A couple of days later the pool water looks good

A couple of days later the pool water looks good

 

I have been enjoying this rhododendron on the back brick pathway. I’m sure the blooms will be gone before the tour, but I am reminded of one of my favorite poems by Edna St. Vincent Millay:

“My candle burns at both ends,

It will not last the night.

But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends

It gives a lovely light.”

 

rhododendron on back brick pathway

rhododendron on back brick pathway

 

I am happy to see that the knockout roses are putting out new flower buds. My boldness in cutting the early buds just may pay off. I hope so.

 

knockout rosebuds on new growth

knockout rosebuds on new growth

 

I have replaced the straggly laurels with some very nice hydrangeas. I think it looks a lot better. I am much happier about this area now.

 

I planted hydrangeas to replace the funky looking laurels

I planted hydrangeas to replace the funky looking laurels

 

The buds on the Annabelle hydrangeas are developing nicely. I do think we will have at least some hydrangea flowers for the tour.

 

It looks like at least some of the hydrangeas will hit the deadline.

It looks like at least some of the hydrangeas will hit the deadline.

 

 

We have tended to the large weeping cherry and I dearly love the way it frames the view of the valley.

 

I love the way the weeping cherry frames the view from the mountain

I love the way the weeping cherry frames the view from the mountain

 

 

We’re right on schedule. It has been a most wonderful spring, hasn’t it?

To see a previous article about this lovely landscape garden, CLICK HERE

To read about Johntheplantman and the rednecks, 

As usual, I would just love for you click here to go to Amazon and purchase the ebook edition of my wonderful book, Requiem for a Redneck to go on your Kindle. I have also noticed that Amazon now has a free Kindle app for iphones and tablets. Is that cool or what?

 

If you want a consultation with John Schulz in your yard in N.W. Georgia, send me an email at wherdepony@bellsouth.net

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